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See also .ax

English

Etymology 1

See axe.

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
ax

Plural
es

ax (es)
  1. Alternative spelling of axe.

Verb

Infinitive
to ax

Third person singular
ax

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
es

to ax (third-person singular simple present ax, present participle es, simple past and past participle -)
  1. Alternative spelling of axe.

Etymology 2

See axe.

Noun

Singular
ax

Plural
es

ax (es)
  1. Alternative spelling of axe.

Verb

Infinitive
to ax

Third person singular
ax

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
es

to ax (third-person singular simple present ax, present participle es, simple past and past participle -)
  1. Alternative spelling of axe.

Etymology 3

Verb

Infinitive
to ax

Third person singular
ax

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
es

to ax (third-person singular simple present ax, present participle es, simple past and past participle -)
  1. Variant of ask.
Usage notes
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The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, 2000 states that "ax, a common nonstandard variant of ask, is often identified as an especially salient feature of African American Vernacular English. While it is true that the form is frequent in the speech of African Americans, it used to be common in the speech of white Americans as well, especially in New England. This should not be surprising since ax is a very old word in English, having been used in England for over 1,000 years. In Old English we find both scian and csian, and in Middle English both asken and axen. Moreover, the forms with "cs" or "x" had no stigma associated with them. Chaucer used asken and axen interchangeably, as in the lines 'I wol aske, if it hir will be/To be my wyf' and 'Men axed hym, what sholde bifalle,' both from The Canterbury Tales. The forms in "x" arose from the forms in "sk" by a linguistic process called metathesis, in which two sounds are reversed. The "x" thus represents /ks/, the flipped version of /sk/. Metathesis is a common linguistic process around the world and does not arise from a defect in speaking. Nevertheless, "ax" has become stigmatized as substandard - a fate that has befallen other words, like "ain't", that were once perfectly acceptable in literate circles.


Icelandic

Etymology

Old Norse

Noun

ax n

  1. ear (of corn)

Swedish

Noun

ax n.

  1. ear (fruiting body of a grain plant)


This Swedish entry was created from the translations listed at ear. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see ax in the Swedish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) April 2008

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Last modified on 23 October 2008, at 18:08