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erudite

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
The aim of life is some way of living, as flexible and gentle as human nature; so that ambition may stoop to kindness, and philosophy to condor and humor. Neither prosperity nor empire nor heaven can be worth winning at the price of a virulent temper, bloody hands, an anguished spirit, and a vain hatred of the rest of the world.
George Santayana
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English

Etymology

From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] ērudītus, participle of ērudiō (educate, train), from e- + rudis ‘rude, unskilled’.

Pronunciation

Adjective

erudite

  1. learned, scholarly, with emphasis on knowledge gained from books.

Quotations

  • 1820Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Ch. XII
    At all events, if it involved any secret information in regard to old Roger Chillingworth, it was in a tongue unknown to the erudite clergyman, and did but increase the bewilderment of his mind.

Synonyms

Related terms

Translations


Italian

Adjective

erudite f.

  1. Feminine plural form of erudito

Noun

erudite f.

  1. Plural form of erudita.

Verb

erudite

  1. Second-person plural present tense of erudire.
  2. Second-person plural imperative of erudire.
  3. Feminine plural of erudito.

Latin

Etymology

From ērudītus (educated, accomplished)

Adverb

ērudītē (comparative ērudītius, superlative ērudītissimē)
  1. learnedly, with erudition

Related terms

References

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)

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