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irony

An example of situational irony

English

Etymology 1

First attested in 1502. From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] īrōnīa (perhaps via Middle French ironie), from Ancient Greek εἰρωνεία (eirōneia), irony, pretext) from εἴρων (eirōn), one who feigns ignorance).

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
irony

Plural
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irony ({{{1}}})
  1. A statement that, when taken in context, may actually mean the opposite of what is written literally; the use of words expressing something other than their literal intention.
  2. (colloquial) The quality or state of an event being both coincidental and contradictory in a humorous or poignant and extremely improbable way.
Related terms
Translations
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Etymology 2

From iron.

Pronunciation

Adjective

irony (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
irony

Comparative
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Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Of or pertaining to the metal iron.
    The food had an irony taste to it.
Translations

See also

Elsewhere on the web

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Last modified on 8 November 2008, at 01:54