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'd

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An idea that is not dangerous is unworthy of being called an idea at all.
Don Marquis
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English

Etymology

Suffix

-'d Properly, a "clitic."

  1. Had (marking the pluperfect tense)
  2. (some dialects) Had, possessed.
    • Polly Von - She'd her apron wrapped about her and he took her for a swan
  3. would
    • I'd like to help, but I have no time.
  4. (slang) Did.
  5. (archaic) traditional English past tense indicator, largely replaced by -ed.
    • Shakespeare - Hath thou mark'd the dawn of next?

Related terms

  • -'s (third person)
  • -'ve

Usage notes

  • In most dialects, -'d is only used to mark the pluperfect tense ("I'd done something.", "I had done something."), and not to signify possession in the past ("I had something."). Some dialects, however, use -'d for both.

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