Visit the forum if you have a language query!

-es

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Life at the top is financially rewarding, spiritually draining, physically exhausting, and short.
Peter C. Newman
Jump to: navigation, search

English

Suffix

-es

  1. Used to form the plural of some nouns
    1. that end in "s" - bus => buses
    2. that end in "x" - box => boxes
    3. that end in "z" - fizz => fizzes
    4. that end in "o" - bongo => bongoes

Esperanto

Suffix

-es

  1. belonging to. (Ending for genitive correlatives.)

Derived terms

  • kies: belonging to whom, whose
  • ties: belonging to that one, that one's
  • ĉies: belonging to everyone, everyone's
  • ies: belonging to someone, someone's
  • nenies: belonging to nobody, nobody's

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈɛʃ/

Suffix

-es

  1. Creates adjectives from nouns meaning "having something".
    kert (garden) - kertes (something with a garden, for example describing a house that has a garden)
  2. Creates nouns from nouns, for example names of occupations and collective nouns.
    perec (pretzel) - pereces (someone who sells pretzels)
    meggy (morello, sour cherry) - meggyes (cherry orchard)
  3. Creates digits or figures from ordinal numbers.
    egy (one) - egyes (the digit or figure 1)

Usage notes

The form -es is only used with front vowel harmony along with -ös; while -os is used with back vowel harmony and -s is used with words ending in a vowel.

See also


Old English

Suffix

-es

  1. Possessive marker, indicating than an object belongs to the noun

Derived terms

  • 's (in English): Possessive marker

Spanish

Suffix

-es

  1. Suffix indicating the second-person singular present indicate of -er and -ir verbs.
  2. Suffix indicating the second-person singular present subjunctive of -ar verbs

See also


Swedish

Suffix

-es

  1. Suffix used for marking the passive voice of verbs. This variant is used for the present passive of those verbs of the second and fourth conjugations (weak and strong -er verbs respectively) that have stems ending in s. Other verbs normally take only -s. However, until the middle decades of the 20th century (approximately) it was rule to use -es with all -er verbs, which today is considered archaic. This use may occasionally appear in more modern texts (certain phrases).
  1. läses = is read
    låses = is locked

See also

Elsewhere on the web

En-En

En-It

En-Fr

En-El

En-Sp

En-Mul

En-De

OnelookIATEIATEIATEIATEProZDict.cc
WordnikIATELinguee
GoogleIATE