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Bob's your uncle

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English

Etymology

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Thought to derive from the appointment of Arthur Balfour as Secretary for Ireland, in 1887, by his uncle, the prime minister, Robert, Lord Salisbury. This theory of origin is questionable as the first use in print is not until 1937. A more probable theory is that it comes from the slang phrase all is bob, meaning that everything is safe, pleasant or satisfactory. This dates back to the 17th century or so. The expression may also be a reference to Sir Robert Peel, the founder of England's Metropolitan Police, meaning one is taken care of, and that things are thus all right.

Phrase

Bob’s your uncle

  1. (UK, idiomatic) "No problem" or "the solution is simple", you have what you want, all will be well (appended to the end of a description of how to achieve something).
    Insert the plug, press the switch, and Bob's your uncle.
    You want to go to the stadium? Go straight on until you reach the park, take the first left and Bob’s your uncle!

References

  • Francis Grose, Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, First edition, 1785

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