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a-

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Life's greatest happiness is to be convinced we are loved.
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English

Etymology 1

From Old English ā-, originally ar-. Cognate with German er-.

Pronunciation

Prefix

a- no longer productive

  1. forming verbs with the sense away, from, out, e.g. arise, await

Etymology 2

A proclitic form of preposition a

Pronunciation

Prefix

a- no longer productive

  1. in, on
    (An example for this word is being sought):

Etymology 3

From Middle English variant form of y-, from Old English ġe-.

Pronunciation

Prefix

a- no longer productive

  1. representing the Anglo-Saxon intensifying prefix, sometimes with little change in meaning, e.g. aware

Etymology 4

From Anglo-Norman a-, from Old French e-, from [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] ex-.

Pronunciation

Prefix

a- no longer productive

  1. forming words with the sense of wholly, out, e.g. abash

Etymology 5

From Ancient Greek ἀ- (a-) (ἀν- (an-) immediately preceding a vowel).

Pronunciation

Prefix

a-

  1. Forming words denoting absence or lack, e.g. abyss, amoral, usually with stems beginning with consonants.
    • 1948 (revised 1952), Robert Graves, The White Goddess, Faber & Faber 1999, p. 7:
      When invited to believe in the Chimaera, the horse-centaurs, or the winged horse Pegasus, all of them straightforward Pelasgian cult-symbols, a philosopher felt bound to reject them as a-zoölogical improbabilities [...].
Related terms

Croatian

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἀ- (a-) (ἀν- (an-) immediately preceding a vowel).

Prefix

a-

  1. Prefix prepended to words to denote a negation, deprivation or absence of a property denoted by base word.

French

Etymology 1

From Old French, from [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:fr:Template:lang:la derivations]] ad-.

Prefix

a-

  1. A prefix forming words, especially verbs, that denote entering a state, making progress toward a goal, or the like.

Etymology 2

From Ancient Greek ἀ- (a-) (ἀν- (an-) immediately preceding a vowel); generalized from the many Latin borrowings using this prefix.

Prefix

a-

  1. a-, non-, -less.

References


Latin

Alternative forms

Etymology

From ab (away from)

Prefix

a- [[Category:Template:lang:la prefixes|a-]]

  1. away from

Usage notes

  • used before consonants, but not usually not 'c' or 't'.

Old English

Etymology

From an earlier form ar-, from Germanic. Cognate with German er-.

Pronunciation

Prefix

ā-

  1. forming words with the sense from, away, off, out, e.g. āniman

Elsewhere on the web

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