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abate

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English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old French abatre "to beat down", from Late Latin abatere, formed from ab- or ad- + battere, from Latin battuere "to beat".

Verb

Infinitive
to abate

Third person singular
abat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to abate (third-person singular simple present abat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To bring down or reduce to a lower state, number, degree or estimation; to lessen; to diminish; to contract; to moderate; to cut short.
    Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.
    • 1605: She hath abated me of half my train — William Shakespeare, King Lear, II.ii
    • 1611: His eye was not dim, nor his natural force abated. — Deuteronomy 34:7
    • To abate the edge of envy. - Francis Bacon
  2. (transitive) To bring down (a person) physically or mentally; to humble; to depress.
  3. (intransitive) To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; to experience a diminution of force or of intensity.
    The pain abates.
    • The fury of Glengarry ... rapidly abated. - Thomas Macaulay
    • 1719- Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
      ...in the morning, the wind having abated overnight, the sea was calm, and I ventured...
  4. (transitive) To deduct; to omit; as, to abate some amount from a price or count.
    • Nine thousand parishes, abating the odd hundreds. - Fuller
  5. (transitive) To bar; to except.
  6. (transitive) (obsolete except in law) To bring entirely down or put an end to; to do away with; to destroy; to level with the ground.
    To abate a nuisance.
    To abate a writ.
    • The King of Scots ... sore abated the walls. - Edward Hall
  7. (intransitive) To be defeated or come to naught; to fall through; to fail.
    The writ has abated.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
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Noun

Singular
abate

Plural
{{{1}}}

abate ({{{1}}})
  1. (obsolete) abatement. - Sir T. Browne

Etymology 2

From Italian abate

Noun

Singular
abate

Plural
{{{1}}}

abate ({{{1}}})
  1. An Italian abbot.

Shorthand


Italian

Pronunciation

Noun

abate m. (plural abati)

  1. abbot

Related terms


Novial

Noun

abate

  1. abbot or abbess

Related terms


Romanian

Etymology

from Italian abate

Noun

abate m., pl. abaţi

  1. abbot.

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