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abhor

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
It's better to be an authentic loser than a false success, and to die alive than to live dead.
William Markiewicz
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English

Etymology

First attested in 1449. From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] abhorreō from ab- + horreō (stand aghast). Cognate with French abhorrer.

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to abhor

Third person singular
abhor

Simple past
ing

Past participle
-

Present participle
r

to abhor (third-person singular simple present abhor, present participle r, simple past and past participle ing)
  1. (transitive) To regard with horror or detestation; to shrink back with shuddering from; to feel excessive repugnance toward; to detest to extremity; to loathe.
    • Abhor that which is evil; cleave to that which is good. - Romans 12:9
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To fill with horror or disgust.
    • It does abhor me now I speak the word. - Shakespeare, Othello, IV-i
  3. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To protest against; to reject solemnly.
    • I utterly abhor, yea, from my soul Refuse you for my judge. - Shakespeare, Henry VIII, II-iv
  4. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To shrink back with horror, disgust, or dislike; to be contrary or averse; -- with from.
    • To abhor from those vices. - Udall
    • Which is utterly abhorring from the end of all law. - Milton

Synonyms

Related terms

Translations

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Shorthand

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