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abridge

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Love is the extra effort we make in our dealings with those whom we do not like and once you understand that, you understand all. This idea that love overtakes you is nonsense. This is but a polite manifestation of sex. To love another you have to undertake some fragment of their destiny.
Quentin Crisp
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English

Etymology

From Middle English abregen, from 14th Century Middle French abregier, (French abréger), from Late Latin abbrevio, from [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] ad + brēvio (shorten). See brief and compare abbreviate

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to abridge

Third person singular
abridg

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to abridge (third-person singular simple present abridg, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To make shorter; to shorten in duration; to lessen; to diminish; to curtail; as, to abridge labor; to abridge power or rights.
    • The bridegroom ... abridged his visit. - Smollett
    • She retired herself to Sebaste, and abridged her train from state to necessity. - Fuller
  2. (transitive) To shorten or contract by using fewer words, yet retaining the sense; to epitomize; to condense; as, to abridge a history or dictionary.
  3. (transitive) To deprive; to cut off; -- followed by of, and formerly by from; as, to abridge one of his rights.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

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Anagrams

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