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abrogate

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Often people attempt to live their lives backwards; they try to have more things, or more money, in order to do more of what they want, so they will be happier.
Margaret Young
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English

Etymology

From Latin abrogatus, past participle of abrogare, which is formed from ab + rogare "to ask", "to inquire", "to propose a law". See rogation.

Pronunciation

  • (RP) IPA: /ˈæbrəgeɪt/

Adjective

abrogate (not comparable)

Positive
abrogate

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. (obsolete) Abrogated; abolished. - Latimer

Verb

Infinitive
to abrogate

Third person singular
abrogat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to abrogate (third-person singular simple present abrogat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To annul by an authoritative act; to abolish by the authority of the maker or his successor; to repeal; -- applied to the repeal of laws, decrees, ordinances, the abolition of customs, etc.
    • Let us see whether the New Testament abrogates what we so frequently see in the Old. - South
    • Whose laws, like those of the Medes and Persian, they cannot alter or abrogate. - Burke
  2. (transitive) To put an end to; to do away with.

Synonyms

Related terms

Translations


Italian

Verb

abrogate

  1. Second-person plural present tense of abrogare.
  2. Second-person plural imperative of abrogare.
  3. Feminine plural of abrogato.

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