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absorb

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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Piet Hein
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English

Etymology

15th Century, via Old French, from Latin absorbere, which is formed from prefix ab- (from), + sorbere (suck in), akin to Greek; compare French absorber.

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to absorb

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to absorb (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To include so that it no longer has separate existence; to swallow up; to engulf; to overwhelm; to cause to disappear as if by swallowing up; to use up; to incorporate; to assimilate.
    • Dark oblivion soon absorbs them all. - Cowper
    • The large cities absorb the wealth and fashion. - W. Irving
  2. (transitive) To suck up; to drink in; to imbibe; as a sponge or as the lacteals of the body. - Bacon
  3. (transitive) To learn
  4. (transitive) To engross or engage wholly; to occupy fully; as, absorbed in study or in the pursuit of wealth.
  5. (transitive) To consume completely.
  6. (transitive) To endure.
  7. (transitive) (physics) To take up by chemical or physical action.
    Heat, light, and electricity are absorbed in the substances into which they pass.
  8. (transitive) (finance) To assume or pay for as part of a commercial transaction.

Synonyms

to take in

Antonyms

  • (physics: to take up by chemical or physical action): emit

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

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