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ac

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Life is a succession of lessons enforced by immediate reward, or, oftener, by immediate chastisement.
Ernest Dimnet
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English

Etymology

Old English ac.

Conjunction

ac

  1. (obsolete) But.

Classical Nahuatl

Pronunciation

Pronoun

āc (plural āc ihqueh, āquihqueh)

  1. Who.

Related terms

References

  • Karttunen, Frances (1983). An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, p. 1, Austin: University of Texas Press.
  • Lockhart, James (2001). Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts, p. 210, Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Latin

Conjunction

ac

  1. and
  2. same as atque (and also)
  3. and besides
  4. than
    • Ea res longe aliter, ac ratus erat, evenit.
      It happened differently than he had thought.

Usage notes

  • ac is usually found in front of words beginning with consonants, rarely before vowels (compare: atque).

Old English

Etymology 1

From Germanic *aik-. Cognate with Old Frisian ēk, Old Saxon ēk (Dutch eik), Old High German eih (German Eiche), Old Norse eik (Swedish ek).

Pronunciation

Noun

āc f. (plural ǣċ)

  1. oak (wood or tree)
  2. (poetic) an oaken ship
  3. The runic character ᚪ (/a/)
Descendants

Etymology 2

From Germanic *ak-. Cognate with Old Saxon ac, Gothic 𐌰𐌺, Old High German oh.

Pronunciation

Conjunction

ac

  1. but

Romanian

Etymology

Latin acus

Noun

ac f. and m.

  1. needle

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