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accompany

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Life would be dull without them.
Oscar Wilde
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English

Etymology

From Old French accompaignier, ‘to associate with’, from compaign, compain, ‘companion’. See company.

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to accompany

Third person singular
accompan

Simple past
ed

Past participle
-

Present participle
i

to accompany (third-person singular simple present accompan, present participle i, simple past and past participle ed)
  1. (intransitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) (A date for this quote is being sought): To associate in a company; to keep company. — Bacon
    • (A date for this quote is being sought): Men say that they will drive away one another, … and not accompany together. — Holland
  2. (intransitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) (A date for this quote is being sought): To cohabit (with). — Milton
  3. (intransitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To perform an accompanying part or parts in a composition.
  4. (transitive) To go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.
    • He accompanied his speech with a bow.
    • (A date for this quote is being sought): The Persian dames, … / In sumptuous cars, accompanied his march. — Glover
    • (A date for this quote is being sought): They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. — Sir P. Sidney
    • (A date for this quote is being sought): He was accompanied by two carts filled with wounded rebels. — Macaulay
  5. (transitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) (A date for this quote is being sought): To cohabit with — Sir T. Herbert
  6. (transitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To perform an accompanying part next to another instrument.
    • The strings were accompanied by two woodwinds.
Synonyms
  • We accompany those with whom we go as companions. The word imports an equality of station.
  • We attend those whom we wait upon or follow. The word conveys an idea of subordination.
  • We escort those whom we attend with a view to guard and protect.
    A gentleman accompanies a friend to some public place; he attends or escorts a lady.
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

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