Visit the forum if you have a language query!

archaic

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Life is a grindstone. Whether it grinds us down or polishes us up depends on us.
Thomas L. Holdcroft
Jump to: navigation, search

English

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἀρχαικός (arkhaikos), old-fashioned) from ἀρχαῖος (arkhaios), from the beginning, antiquated, ancient, old), from ἀρχή (arkhē), beginning, origin) from ἄρχω (arkhō), I am first).

Adjective

archaic (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
archaic

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Of or characterized by antiquity; old-fashioned, quaint, antiquated, as an archaic word or phrase.
    • 1848: James Russel Lowell, The Biglow Papers - A person familiar with the dialect of certain portions of Massachusetts will not fail to recognize, in ordinary discourse, many words now noted in English vocabularies as archaic, the greater part of which were in common use about the time of the King James translation of the Bible. Shakespeare stands less in need of a glossary to most New Englanders than to many a native of the Old Country.
    • 1887: Barcley V. Head, Historia Numorum A Manual Of Greek Numismatics - There is in the best archaic coin work [of the Greeks] ... a strength and a delicacy which are often wanting in the fully developed art of a later age.
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) No longer in ordinary use, though still used occasionally to give a sense of antiquity.
    1898 Brann's compass of words, idioms and phrases harks back to the archaic and reaches forward to the futuristic.— William Cowper Brann, The Complete Works of Brann the Iconoclast, Volume 1.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

Elsewhere on the web

En-En

En-It

En-Fr

En-El

En-Sp

En-Mul

En-De

OnelookIATEIATEIATEIATEProZDict.cc
WordnikIATELinguee
GoogleIATE