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bate

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
I try to give to the poor people for love what the rich could get for money. No, I wouldn't touch a leper for a thousand pounds; yet I willingly cure him for the love of God.
Mother Teresa
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English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Aphetic from abate.

Verb

Infinitive
to bate

Third person singular
bat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to bate (third-person singular simple present bat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To reduce the force of something; to abate.
  2. (transitive) To restrain, usually with the sense of being in anticipation; as, with bated breath.
  3. (transitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To cut off, remove, take away.
    • c.1658 Dr. Henry More, Government of the Tongue :
      He will not bate an ace of absolute certainty.

References

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, Robert Hunter and Charles Morris, eds., v 1 p 459.

Etymology 2

Noun: From the verb, or directly from the noun debate. Verb: From Anglo-Saxon = contention. From Old French batre (French battre). From Late Latin batere.

Noun

Singular
bate

Plural
-

bate (-)
  1. Strife; contention.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 2
      ... and wears his boots very smooth, like unto the sign of the leg, and breeds no bate with telling of discreet stories;
    • 1888, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night (Arabian Nights)
      So the strife redoubled and the weapons together clashed and ceased not bate and debate and naught was to be seen but blood flowing and necks bowing;
    • 1911, H.G. Wells, The New Machiavelli
      The other merely needs jealousy and bate, of which there are great and easily accessible reservoirs in every human heart.

Verb

Infinitive
to bate

Third person singular
bat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to bate (third-person singular simple present bat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (intransitive) To contend or strive with blows or arguments.
  2. (intransitive) Of a falcon: To flap the wings vigorously.

See also

  • (To contend or strive with blows or arguments): bait.

Etymology 3

From Swedish beta (maceration, tanning)

Noun

Singular
bate

Plural
{{{1}}}

bate ({{{1}}})
  1. An alkaline lye which neutralizes the effect of the previous application of lime, and makes hides supple in the process of tanning.
  2. A vat which contains this liquid.

Verb

Infinitive
to bate

Third person singular
bat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to bate (third-person singular simple present bat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To soak leather so as to remove chemicals used in tanning; to steep in bate.

References

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, Robert Hunter and Charles Morris, eds., v 1 p 459.

Anagrams


Spanish

Noun

bate m. (plural bates)

Singular
bate m.

Plural
bates m.

  1. (sports) bat
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) reefer, joint.

Synonyms

Elsewhere on the web

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