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beam

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English

Etymology

Middle English beem, Old English bēam, originally meaning "tree," cognate with Dutch boom, German Baum, Old High German boum "tree"

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
beam

Plural
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beam ({{{1}}})
  1. Any large piece of timber or iron long in proportion to its thickness, and prepared for use.
  2. One of the principal horizontal timbers of a building; one of the transverse members of a ship's frame on which the decks are laid - supported at the sides by knees in wooden ships and by stringers in steel ones.
  3. (nautical) The maximum width of a vessel; as, one vessel is said to have more beam than another; also called breadth. (FM 55-501).
  4. The crossbar of a mechanical balance, from the ends of which the scales are suspended.
  5. The principal stem of the antler of a deer.
  6. The pole of a carriage.
  7. A cylinder of wood, making part of a loom, on which weavers wind the warp before weaving; also, the cylinder on which the cloth is rolled, as it is woven; one being called the fore beam, the other the back beam.
  8. The straight part or shank of an anchor.
  9. The central bar of a plow, to which the handles and colter are secured, and to the end of which are attached the oxen or horses that draw it.
  10. A heavy iron lever having an oscillating motion on a central axis, one end of which is connected with the piston rod from which it receives motion, and the other with the crank of the wheel shaft; -- called also working beam or walking beam.
  11. A ray or collection of parallel rays emitted from the sun or other luminous body; as, a beam of light, or of heat.
  12. (figuratively) A ray; a gleam; as, a beam of comfort.
  13. One of the long feathers in the wing of a hawk; -- called also beam feather.
  14. (music) A horizontal bar which connects the stems of two or more notes to group them and to indicate metric value.

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

Infinitive
to beam

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to beam (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To transmit matter or information via a high-tech wireless mechanism.
    Beam me up, Scotty; there's no intelligent life down here. [Star Trek]
  2. To smile broadly or especially cheerfully.

Old English

Etymology

From West Germanic *bauma-. Cognate with Old Frisian bām, Old Saxon bām (Dutch boom), Old High German boum (German Baum). The word is related in some way to Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌲𐌼𐍃, Old Norse baðmr, suggesting a possible ultimate Germanic source *baugmaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /bæːɑm/

Noun

bēam m.

  1. tree
    on ðæs beames bledum: on the branches of the tree
  2. the Cross
    Wæs se beam bocstafum awriten: the Cross was inscribed with letters (Codex Vercillensis)
  3. beam of wood

Declension

Singular Plural
nominative bēam bēamas
accusative bēam bēamas
genitive bēames bēama
dative bēame bēamum


Descendants


Romanian

Pronunciation

Verb

beam

  1. first-person singular imperfect form of [[bea#Template:lang:ro|bea]].
  2. first-person plural imperfect form of [[bea#Template:lang:ro|bea]].

West Frisian

Noun

beam c.

  1. tree

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