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bide

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Such as take lodgings in a head that's to be let unfurnished.
Samuel Butler
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English

Etymology

From Old English bīdan, from Proto-Germanic

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to bide

Third person singular
bides

Simple past
bode or bided

Past participle
bided or bidden

Present participle
biding

to bide (third-person singular simple present bides, present participle biding, simple past bode or bided, past participle bided or bidden)
  1. (transitive) (mostly Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To bear; to endure; to tolerate.
  2. (intransitive) (archaic or Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To dwell or reside in a location; to abide.
  3. (intransitive) (archaic or Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To wait; to be in expectation; to stay; to remain.
  4. (transitive) (archaic) To wait for; to await.

Usage notes

  • The verb has been replaced by abide in Standard English for almost all its uses, and is now rarely found outside the expression bide one's time.

Translations

Derived terms

Related terms


Basque

Noun

bide

  1. path
  2. way

Croatian

Noun

bide

  1. bidet

Danish

Verb

bide

  1. bite (to cut off a piece by clamping the teeth)


This Danish entry was created from the translations listed at bite. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see bide in the Danish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) October 2008


French

Noun

bide m. (plural bides)

  1. A fiasco or flop, particularly in the entertainment industry; a box office bomb.
  2. (informal) The belly, especially a fat one; the stomach or abdomen.
  3. (uncountable) Something fake.

Synonyms

Elsewhere on the web

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