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bound

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
There's night and day, brother, both sweet things; sun, moon, and stars, brother, all sweet things; there's likewise a wind on the heath. Life is very sweet, brother; who would wish to die?
George Borrow
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See also -bound

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

See bind

Verb

bound

  1. Simple past tense and past participle of bind.
    I bound the splint to my leg.
    I had bound the splint with duct tape.

Adjective

bound (not comparable)

Positive
bound

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Obliged to.
    Your are not legally bound to reply.
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Very likely to.
    They were bound to come into conflict eventually.
  3. (linguistics) Refers to a type morpheme that cannot stand alone as a free word
Translations

obliged to

Etymology 2

Noun

Singular
bound

Plural
{{{1}}}

bound ({{{1}}})
  1. (often Template loop detected: Template:context 1) The border of a territory, which one must cross in order to enter or leave the territory.
    I reached the northern bound of my property, took a deep breath, and walked on.
    Somewhere within these bounds you may find a buried treasure.
  2. (mathematics) a value which is known to be greater or smaller than a given set of values
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Derived terms

Verb

Infinitive
to bound

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to bound (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To surround a territory or other geographical entity.
    France, Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra bound Spain.
    Kansas is bounded by Nebraska on the north, Missouri on the east, Oklahoma on the south and Colorado on the west.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

Singular
bound

Plural
{{{1}}}

bound ({{{1}}})
  1. A sizeable jump, leap.
    The deer crossed the stream in a single bound.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to bound

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to bound (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To leap, move by jumping.
    The rabbit bounded down the lane.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

Alteration of boun, with -d partly for euphonic effect and partly by association with Etymology 1, above.

Adjective

bound (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
bound

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. (obsolete) Ready, prepared.
  2. Ready to start or go (to); moving in the direction (of).
    Is that message bound for me?
    Which way are you bound?
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Derived terms

Elsewhere on the web

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