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calender

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

Pronunciation

Homophones

Etymology 1

From French calandre, from Late Latin calendra, corrupted from [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] cylindrus (cylinder), from Ancient Greek κύλινδρος (kulindros).

The English spelling calendar was introduced in the 17th century to differentiate the chronological senses from the machine calender

Noun

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Singular
calender

Plural
{{{1}}}

calender ({{{1}}})
  1. Common misspelling of calendar.
  2. A machine, used for the purpose of giving cloth, paper etc., a smooth, even, and glossy or glazed surface, by cold or hot pressure, or for watering them and giving them a wavy appearance; it consists of two or more cylinders revolving nearly in contact, with the necessary apparatus for moving and regulating.
  3. One who pursues the business of calendering. (More properly, calendrer.)
Translations

(to be checked)

Verb

Infinitive
to calender

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to calender (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To press between rollers for the purpose of making smooth and glossy, or wavy, as woolen and silk stuffs, linens, paper etc., as in the homonymous machine.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Persian قلندر (ghalandar), wandering dervish), from Arabic قلندار (qalandār), wandering dervish), itself from Persian کلندر (kalandar), uncouth man) from کلند (kaland), rough, unshaven).

Noun

Singular
calender

Plural
{{{1}}}

calender ({{{1}}})
  1. One of a wandering, mendicant Sufic order of fantastically dressed or painted dervishes, founded in the 13th century by an Arab name Yusuf.
Translations
  • French: calender

References

  • "calender" in the Online Etymology Dictionary, Douglas Harper, 2001 [1]
  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition
  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

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