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dice

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

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A picture of two wooden dice.

Pronunciation

Noun

dice (singular die)

  1. One of the two plurals of die.
    • 1972, (translation), Einstein: The Life and Times, Avon Books
      I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.
      • 1926 December 12, Albert Einstein, letter to Max Born
        Jedenfalls bin ich überzeugt, dass der Alte nicht würfelt.
  2. (colloquial) An alternative singular of die when the plural is dice.
    • 1980, Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, “The Winner Takes It All”, Super Trouper, Polar Music
      The gods may throw a dice / Their minds as cold as ice

Usage notes

The singular usage is considered incorrect by many authorities. However, it should be noted that some authoritative sources state that “In modern standard English, the singular die (rather than dice) is uncommon. Dice is used for both the singular and the plural.”

Verb

Infinitive
to dice

Third person singular
dic

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to dice (third-person singular simple present dic, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To cut into small cubes.

Translations

Related terms

See also


Italian

Verb form

dice (infinitive dire)[[Category:Template:lang:it verb forms|dice]]

  1. (Third-person singular present tense of dire) Says.

Spanish

Verb

dice (infinitive: decir)

  1. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of decir.
    • (“says”): 1856, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote de la Mancha, Tomo II, Capítulo XXXII:
      Digo, señor Don Quijote, dijo la Duquesa, que en todo cuanto vuesa merced dice va con pie de plomo, y como suele decirse, con la sonda en la mano; y que yo desde aqui adelante creeré, [...] que hay Dulcinea en el Toboso, [...] merecedora que un tal caballero como es el señor Don Quijote la sirva, que es lo mas que puedo ni sé encarecer.
      “I say, Sir Don Quixote,” said the duchess, “that in all your mercy says, he goes with leaden feet, and as the saying goes, with sounding plummet in hand; and that I henceforth will believe, [...] that there is a Dulcinea in El Toboso, [...] deserving of such a knight as Sir Don Quixote in her service, which is the highest praise that I can give her.”

Elsewhere on the web

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