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dig

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Love is not blind—it sees more, not less. But because it sees more, it is willing to see less.
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See also DIG

English

Pronunciation

Etymology

From Middle English diggen, probably cognate with dike, ditch, Dutch dijk, French digue, diguer, German Deich, Romanian dig, Spanish dique, etc.

Verb

Infinitive
to dig

Third person singular
digs

Simple past
dug

Past participle
-

Present participle
digging

to dig (third-person singular simple present digs, present participle digging, simple past and past participle dug)
  1. To move hard-packed earth out of the way, especially downward to make a hole with a shovel. Or to drill etc. through rocks, roads, etc.
    They dug an eight foot deep ditch along the side of the road.
    In the wintertime, heavy truck tires dig into the road, forming potholes.
    If the plane can't pull out of the dive it is in, it'll dig a hole in the ground.
  2. (with "into") To research a particular subject.
    She is going to dig into Egyptian basket-weaving this semester.
  3. (slang) To appreciate, or like.
    Baby, I dig you.
  4. (slang) To understand or show interest in.
    You dig?

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

Singular
dig

Plural
{{{1}}}

dig ({{{1}}})
  1. An archeological investigation
  2. See digs

Synonyms

Translations


Danish

Pronoun

dig

  1. you (informal, sg., acc.)

Swedish

Pronunciation

Alternative spellings

  • dej (strongly colloquial)

Pronoun

dig

  1. you (objective case, singular)
    Jag såg dig aldrig där = I never saw you there
  2. reflexive case of du; c.f. yourself
    Skulle du vilja lära dig jonglera? = Would you like to learn how to juggle?
    Skar du dig på kniven? = Did you cut yourself on the knife?

See also

Usage notes

Note that some verbs have special senses when used reflexively. For example, do not confuse du lär dig att... ("you learn to...") [reflexive] while jag lär dig att... ("I teach you to...") and du lär dig själv att... ("you teach yourself to..."). Here, lär means teach(es) if it is not reflexive, but learn(s) if it is reflexive. Hence the need for the separate pronoun "dig själv" to be used when object and subject agree, but the verb nevertheless should not be used in the reflexive case.

Important to note is also that in the imperative, when there's usually no explicit subject given, the "själv" is dropped.

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