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dignity

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English

Etymology

From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] dignitas, from dignus (worthy, appropriate)

Pronunciation

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Noun

Singular
dignity

Plural
dignities

dignity (dignities)
  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) the set of attributes that distinguish an intelligent, solemn, sober, healthy, independent, adult homo sapiens from a young child or a lunatic.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale, v. i. 183:
      Please you, great sir, / Bohemia greets you from himself by me; / Desires you to attach his son, who has- / His dignity and duty both cast off- Fled from his father, from his hopes, and with / A shepherd's daughter.
    • 1836, Sir H. Taylor, Statesman, xv, 107
      It is of the essence of real dignity to be self-sustained, and no man's dignity can be asserted without being impaired.[1]
    • 2000, J. R. Aldergrove, Why We Are Not Obsolete Yet, 66
      I lose my dignity when I do something an intelligent, solemn, sober, healthy, independent, adult homo sapiens would not do, in my opinion.
  2. A quality or state worthy of esteem and respect, especially humanness, but also, for example, augustness, nobility, majesty, grandeur, glory, superiority, wonderfulness, specialness, uniqueness;
    • 1752, Henry Fielding, Amelia, I. viii
      He uttered this ... with great majesty, or, as he called it, dignity.
    • 1981, African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, art. 5
      Every individual shall have the right to the respect of the dignity inherent in a human being.
    • 2008, Federal Ethics Committee on Non-Human Biotechnology (ECNH) [Switzerland]
      'The dignity of living beings with regard to plants: Moral consideration of plants for their own sake', 3: ... the ECNH has been expected to make proposals from an ethical perspective to concretise the constitutional term dignity of living beings with regard to plants.[2]
  3. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) I, me, myself, we, us, ourselves;
    • 2008, P. A. Lawler, "Modern and American Dignity", in Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics, 229
      Protecting my dignity ... means protecting ... myself.
    • 2008, E. D. Pellegrino, 'The Lived Experience of Human Dignity', Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics, 515
      [T]heir sufferings were so crushingly obvious that to ignore them would have undermined ... our own dignity as well.
  4. decorum, formality, stateliness;
    • 1934, Aldous Huxley, "Puerto Barrios", in Beyond the Mexique Bay:
      Official DIGNITY tends to increase in inverse ratio to the importance of the country in which the office is held.[3]
  5. high office or rank;
    • 1781, Edward Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, F. III. 231:
      He ... distributed the civil and military dignities among his favourites and followers.
  6. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (idiomatic) humanness
    • 1991, Hermann Avenarius, Kleines Rechtswörterbuch
      Every person is born with human dignity and it cannot be lost. The unborn and the dead are also entitled to it.[4]
    • 2008, Adam Schulman, 'Bioethics and the Question of Human Dignity', Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics, 17:
      [T]he march of scientific progress ... will eventually compel us to take a stand on the meaning of human dignity, understood as the essential and inviolable core of our humanity.

Synonyms

Related terms

Translations

References

  • Notes:
  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary 2nd ed. 1989
  2. ^ Dignity of Plants
  3. ^ Columbia World of Quotations 1996.
  4. ^ Avenarius[1]

See also

Elsewhere on the web

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