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ding

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See also Ding, dīng, díng, dǐng, and dìng

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English dingen, probably from Old Norse dengja (to hammer)

Noun

Singular
ding

Plural
{{{1}}}

ding ({{{1}}})
  1. Very minor damage, a small dent or chip.
    As a kid, I always broke off a chunk of wax and jammed it into a fresh ding in hopes of saving the foam from water invasion, but days later I found myself picking out waxy bits from a brown-stained nightmare. — Jay DiMartino [1]
Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to ding

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to ding (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To sound, as a bell; to ring; to clang.
  2. (transitive) To hit or strike.
  3. (transitive) To inflict minor damage upon, especially by hitting or striking.
    If you surf regularly, then you're going to ding your board. — BBC surfing Wales [2]
  4. (transitive) (colloquial) To deduct, as points, from another, in the manner of a penalty.
    My bank dinged me three bucks for using their competitor's ATM.
  5. (golf) To mishit a golf ball.
  6. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (informal) To back out of a task in a shameful manner
    He was supposed to go but he dinged out on me.
Translations

Etymology 2

(onomatopoeia)

Noun

Singular
ding

Plural
{{{1}}}

ding ({{{1}}})
  1. A high-pitched sound of a bell.

Verb

Infinitive
to ding

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to ding (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (intransitive) To make high-pitched sound like a bell.
See also

Etymology 3

From Chinese

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Noun

Singular
ding

Plural
{{{1}}}

ding ({{{1}}})
  1. Ancient Chinese vessel with legs and a lid; also called ting. Chinese: 鼎, pinyin: dǐng.

Dutch

Etymology

Cognate with Old Frisian thing, Old Low German þing, Old High German thing ‘assembly, council’ (German Ding ‘matter, thing’), Old Norse þing (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish ting), Old English þing (English thing.)

Pronunciation

Noun

ding n. (plural dingen, diminutive dingetje)

  1. thing

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA: [dʲɪŋ] or [dʲɪŋɡ]

Verb

ding (present dingeann, past dhing, future dingfidh, conditional dhingfeadh, past participle dingthe, verbal noun dingeadh)

  1. to wedge
  2. to make compact
  3. to dent

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ding dhing nding
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Mandarin

Pinyin syllable

ding

  1. A transliteration of any of a number of Chinese characters properly represented as having one of four tones, dīng, díng, dǐng, or dìng.

Usage notes

English transcriptions of Chinese speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Chinese language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Elsewhere on the web

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