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discus

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

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Etymology

From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] discus.

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
discus

Plural
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discus ({{{1}}})
  1. A round plate-like object that is thrown for sport.
    • 2004, Frank Fitzpatrick, "The amazing story of the first discus medal winner," The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 18,
      He [Robert Garrett] won even though he hadn't ever touched a real discus until just before the event was held.
    • 2008, John Branch, "Estonia's Kanter Celebrates Gold Medal in the Discus His Way", The New York Times, August 23,
      [Gerd] Kanter had agreed to demonstrate his throwing skill on Friday, but rather than bringing his own discuses—he usually travels with about five of them, []
  2. (uncountable) The athletics sport of discus throwing.
  3. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A discus fish.
    • 2008, Carol Roberts, "History of Discus", North American Discus Association,
      The main body of the Amazon River is too fast, too deep, and too silt laden for discus.
  4. (rare, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A chakram.
    • 1893, Krishna-Swaipayana Vyasa, translated by K. M. Ganguli, The Mahabharata, Adi Parva, Section XIX,
      And Narayana instantly cut off with his discus the well-adorned head of the Danava who was drinking the Amrita without permission.
    • 1899, Thomas William Rhys Davids (transl.), Digha Nikaya, "Sàmañña-Phàla Sutta",
      If with a discus with an edge sharp as a razor he should make all the living creatures on the earth one heap, one mass, of flesh, []

Synonyms

Usage notes

  • Although an alternative latinate plural disci is often cited, it is hardly ever used in practice.

Translations


Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek δίσκος (diskos).

Pronunciation

Noun

discus (genitive discī); m, second declension

  1. a discus, quoit
  2. a dish shaped like a discus
  3. disc of a sundial

Inflection

Number Singular Plural
nominative discus discī
genitive discī discōrum
dative discō discīs
accusative discum discōs
ablative discō discīs
vocative disce discī

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