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down

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William Mcdougall
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English

Etymology

  • Cognate with dune, town, Middle Dutch dune "sandy hill," Old English dun "hill," Old Irish dun "hill, fort." Note the second syllable of London, Verdun, etc. From Proto-Germanic *dana (prefix used before verbs (eg: dana-zeran, ‘to tear down’)).

Pronunciation

Adverb

down (incomparable and comparable), (comparative farther down, superlative farthest down)

  1. (comparable) From a higher position to a lower one; downwards.
    • The cat jumped down from the table.
    • His place is farther down the road.
  2. South (as south is at the bottom of typical maps).
    • I went down to Miami for a conference.
  3. (Hiberno English) Away from the city (even if the location is to the North).
    • He went down to Cavan. Down on the farm. Down country.
  4. Into a state of non-operation.
    • The computer has been shut down.
    • They closed the shop down.
  5. (rail transport) Traditional term for the direction leading away from the principal terminus, away from milepost zero.

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Preposition

down

  1. From one end to another; especially, from a higher end to a lower.
    • The ball rolled down the hill.
    • The bus went down the street.
    • They walked down the beach holding hands.

Translations

Adjective

down (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
down

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Depressed, feeling low.
    So, things got you down? / Is Rodney Dangerfield giving you no respect? / Well, bunky, cheer up!
  2. On a lower level than before.
    The stock market is down.
    Prices are down.
  3. (colloquial) With "on", negative about, hostile to
    Ever since Nixon, I've been down on Republicans.
  4. (not comparable, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) With "with", relaxed about, accepting of
    I'm down with him hanging with us.
  5. (not comparable) Inoperable; out of order; out of service.
  6. Of a task; finished in phrases like
    Two down and three to go. (Two tasks completed and three more still to be done.)

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

Singular
down

Plural
s

down (s)
  1. Soft, fluffy immature feathers which grow on young birds. Used as insulating material in duvets, sleeping bags and jackets.
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Field, especially for racing.
  3. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Hill, rolling grassland (such as "Churchill Downs", "Upson Downs" from Auntie Mame, by Patrick Dennis).
  4. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A single play, from the time the ball is snapped (the start) to the time the whistle is blown (the end) when the ball is down, or is downed.
    • I bet after the third down, the kicker will replace the quarterback on the field.

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

Infinitive
to down

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to down (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To drink or swallow, especially without stopping before the vessel containing the liquid is empty.
    He downed an ale and ordered another.
  2. (transitive) To cause to come down.
    The storm downed several old trees along the highway.
  3. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To put a ball in a pocket; to pot a ball.
    He downed two balls on the break.

Translations

Derived terms


Dutch

Etymology

From English down.

Pronunciation

Adjective

down (used only predicatively)

  1. Down, depressed.

Synonyms


German

Etymology

From English down.

Adjective

down (not comparable)

  1. Down, depressed.

Elsewhere on the web

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