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dramatic

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
There's night and day, brother, both sweet things; sun, moon, and stars, brother, all sweet things; there's likewise a wind on the heath. Life is very sweet, brother; who would wish to die?
George Borrow
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English

Etymology

From Ancient Greek δραματικός (dramatikos) from δρᾶμα (drama), drama, play) from δράω (draō), I do, accomplish).

Adjective

dramatic (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
dramatic

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Of or relating to the drama.
    • 1911, “Music”, in 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica,  
      Monteverde found the conditions of dramatic music more favourable to his experiments than those of choral music, in which both voices and ears are at their highest sensibility to discord.
  2. Striking in appearance or effect.
    • 1986, Ronald Reagan, Proclamation 5430,  
      Each year remarkable advances in prenatal medicine bring ever more dramatic confirmation of what common sense told us all along-that the child in the womb is simply what each of us once was: a very young, very small, dependent, vulnerable member of the human family.
  3. Having a powerful, expressive singing voice.

Derived terms

Translations

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