Visit the forum if you have a language query!

dry

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Nothing is more dangerous than an idea, when you only have one.
Alain Chartier
Jump to: navigation, search

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old English dryġe (dry)

Adjective

dry (comparative drier, superlative driest or dryest)

Positive
dry

Comparative
drier

Superlative
driest or dryest

  1. Free from liquid or moisture.
    Could you hand me a dry towel?
    My throat feels itchy and dry.
    Cover the chicken as it bakes or it'll get too dry.
  2. (chemistry) Free of water in any state; anhydrous
    Dry alcohol is 200 proof.
  3. Maintaining temperance; void or abstinent from alcoholic beverages.
    A former alcoholic, he's been dry for almost a year now.
    You'll have to drive out of this dry county to find any liquor.
  4. Of an alcoholic drink that is not sweet, and /or has a high alcohol content.
    I like to take a dry sherry before lunch on Sundays.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English dryġan (to dry), from dryġe (dry)

Verb

Infinitive
to dry

Third person singular
dries

Simple past
dried

Past participle
-

Present participle
drying

to dry (third-person singular simple present dries, present participle drying, simple past and past participle dried)
  1. (intransitive) To become dry.
  2. (transitive) To make dry. (e.g., your eyes)
    Devin dried her eyes with a handkerchief.
Derived terms
Translations

Old English

Pronunciation

Etymology

From Celtic *druwis: cognate with Old Irish druí (Irish draoi, Gaelic druidh ‘magician’).

Noun

drȳ m

  1. a sorcerer or magician
    Hi woldon forbærnan ðone dry. —Ælfric’s Homilies, vol. 1. (‘They would burn the sorceror.’)

Derived terms

Elsewhere on the web

En-En

En-It

En-Fr

En-El

En-Sp

En-Mul

En-De

OnelookIATEIATEIATEIATEProZDict.cc
WordnikIATELinguee
GoogleIATE