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dyed-in-the-wool

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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William Hazlitt
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English

Etymology

From the past participle of dye in the wool

Pronunciation

Adjective

dyed-in-the-wool (comparative more, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
dyed-in-the-wool

Comparative
more

Superlative
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  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Dyed before being formed into cloth.
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Firmly established in a person's beliefs or habits; deeply ingrained in the nature of a person or thing.
    Smith was a dyed-in-the-wool typist and never really got used to writing on computers.
    John Major was described by his opponents as a dyed-in-the-wool Conservative.

Translations

Usage notes

The expression "dyed in the wool" refers to a state of steadfastness, especially with respect to one's political, religious or social beliefs. The expression comes from the fact that fabric can be dyed in a number of ways. The woven fabric may be dyed after it is complete, or the threads may be dyed before they are woven. When a color is "dyed in the wool," the wool itself is dyed before being spun into threads, so the colour is least likely to fade or change.

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