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fox

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A red fox (Vulpes vulpes).
See also Fox

English

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Etymology

O.E. fox, from W.Gmc. *fukhs (cf. O.H.G. fuhs, O.N. foa, Goth. fauho'), from P.Gmc. base *fuh-, corresponding to PIE *puk- "tail" (cf. Skt. puccha- "tail"). The bushy tail is also the source of words for "fox" in Welsh (llwynog, from llwyn "bush"); Pt. (raposa, from rabo "tail"); Lith. (uodegis "fox," from uodega "tail").

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
fox

Plural
es

fox (es)
  1. A red fox, small carnivore (Vulpes vulpes), related to dogs and wolves, with red or silver fur and a bushy tail.
  2. Any of numerous species of small wild canids resembling the red fox. In the taxonomy they form the genus Vulpes wihin the family Canidae, consisting of nine genera (see the Wikipedia article on the fox).
  3. A fox terrier.
  4. A cunning person.
  5. (slang) An attractive man or woman.

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
  • Chumash (Inezeño): knɨy

See also

Verb

Infinitive
to fox

Third person singular
fox

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
es

to fox (third-person singular simple present fox, present participle es, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To trick, fool or outwit (someone) by cunning or ingenuity.
  2. (transitive) To confuse or baffle (someone).
    This crossword puzzle has completely foxed me.
  3. (intransitive) To act slyly or craftily.
  4. (intransitive) To discolour paper. Fox marks are spots on paper caused by humidity.
    The pages of the book show distinct foxing.

Derived terms

Translations

See also


Old English

Etymology

From Germanic *fuhsa- < Indo-European *puk-, *peuk- (‘bushy hair’). Cognate with Old Saxon vuhs (Dutch vos), Old High German fuhs (German Fuchs). A North Germanic variant *fuhō- gave Old Norse fóa, Norn fūa. The IE root was also the source of Avestan pusa- (‘plait’), Slavic *puxъ (Russian пух ‘fuzz’), Baltic *pausti- (Lithuanian paustìs ‘fur’).

Pronunciation

Noun

fox m.

  1. a fox

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