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gaol

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English

Etymology

From Northern Old French gaole (modern French geôle), from gabiola, a popular diminutive of [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] cavea (cage).

Pronunciation

Noun

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Singular
gaol

Plural
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gaol ({{{1}}})
  1. (UK) Alternative spelling of jail.
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) prefered Alternative spelling of jail.

Verb

Infinitive
to gaol

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to gaol (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (UK) To confine in a gaol; to imprison

Synonyms

See prison

Translations

See prison

Derived terms


Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA: [ɡiːl̪ˠ] or [ɡeːl̪ˠ]

Noun

gaol m.

  1. Relationship, kinship; kindred feeling.
  2. Relations, kin; relative.
  3. Relation between things, connection.

Declension

First declension

Bare forms:

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gaol gaolta
Vocative a ghaoil a ghaolta
Genitive gaoil gaolta
Dative gaol gaolta

Forms with the definite article:

Case Singular Plural
Nominative an gaol na gaolta
Genitive an ghaoil na ngaolta
Dative leis an ngaol

don ghaol

leis na gaolta

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gaol ghaol ngaol
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

Irish gaol (kin, family), Early Irish gáel (relationship): *gailo-; Lithuanian gailùs (compassionate); Gothic gailjan (gladden), German geil (wanton); Greek φίλιος (fílios), friendly).

Pronunciation

  • IPA: g̊ɯːɫ

Noun

gaol m.

  1. love
    Tha gaol agam ort, a leannain mo chridhe.... — Literally, “Love is at-me on thee, O darling of my heart....”

Usage notes

The love expressed by gaol is more intimate in nature than that of gràdh.

Derived terms

References

  • An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Alexander MacBain, Gairm Publications, 1982

Elsewhere on the web

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