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grammar

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
The surrender of life is nothing to sinking down into acknowledgment of inferiority.
John C. Calhoun
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English

Etymology

From Middle English gramarye, gramery, from Old French gramaire (classical learning), from [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] grammatica, from Ancient Greek γραμματική (grammatike), skilled in writing), from γράμμα (gramma), line of writing), from γράφω (write), from Proto-Indo-European base *gerebh- (to scratch)

Pronunciation

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Noun

Singular
grammar

Plural
s

grammar (s)
  1. A system of rules and principles for speaking and writing a language.
  2. (uncountable, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) The study of the internal structure of words (morphology) and the use of words in the construction of phrases and sentences (syntax).
  3. A book describing the rules of grammar of a language.
  4. (computing theory) A formal system specifying the syntax of a language.
  5. (computing theory) A formal system defining a formal language

Synonyms

  • (in linguistics): morpho-syntax (from the relationship between morphology and syntax)

Derived terms

Translations

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See also

Trivia

  • The words "grammar" and "glamour" derive from the same root, relics of a time when being able to read and write was an arcane skill with a whiff of sorcery. A scribe was seen as enchanted ("glamorous") and with a knowledge of grammar.

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