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great

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

Pronunciation

Etymology

Old English grēat.

Homophones

Adjective

great (comparative greater, superlative greatest)

Positive
great

Comparative
greater

Superlative
greatest

  1. Very big, large scale.
    A great storm is approaching our shores.
  2. Very good.
    Dinner was great.
  3. Important.
  4. Title referring to an important leader.
    Alexander the Great

Usage notes

In simple situations, using modifiers of intensity such as fairly, somewhat, etc. can lead to an awkward construction, with the exception of certain common expressions such as “so great” and “really great”. In particular “very great” is unusually strong as a reaction, and in many cases “great” or its meaning of “very good” will suffice.

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Interjection

great

  1. Expression of gladness and content about something.
    Great! Thanks for the wonderful work.
  2. sarcastic inversion thereof.
    Oh, great! I just dumped all 500 sheets of the manuscript all over and now I have to put them back in order.

Translations

Noun

Singular
great

Plural
{{{1}}}

great ({{{1}}})
  1. A person of major significance, accomplishment or acclaim.
    Newton and Einstein are two of the greats of the history of science.

Derived terms


Old English

Etymology

West Germanic *grauta.

Adjective

grēat

  1. great

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