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harr

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English

Etymology 1

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Noun

Singular
harr

Plural
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harr ({{{1}}})
  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (dialectal) A sea mist.
    • 1848, William Davidson, "Observations on the Climate of Largs"[1], Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, Volume 69, "Arran", page 39f.,
      Fogs and harrs are unfrequent, as are constant rain; mornings of drenching flood being often succeeded by bright and beautiful days.
  2. (Scotland) A wind from the east.
    • 1847, James Hogg et al., “The Thunder-Storms of Summer 1846”, in Hogg's Weekly Instructor: vol. IV[2], page 383,  
      In September and October, the season of east winds, and harrs, and thunder-storms was past, but even during these months there did seem to linger some electrical activity.
Alternative spellings

Usage notes

  • Fog sense often used in British English literature

References

  • 1880, John Jamieson, An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, [page 489]
  • 1961, edited by Joseph Wright, The English Dialect Dictionary: Being the Complete Vocabulary of All Dialect ..., Vol. 3, page 5
    A northern harr Brings fine weather from far'; n.Yks.* e.Yks. MARSHALL Rur. Econ. ... The harr was very heavy in the marshes this mornin' (THR). 2.
  • 2005, Bill Griffiths, A Dictionary of North East Dialect - page 80
    ... "hare or harr - a mist or thick fog" Brockett Newc & Nth 1829; "harr - a strong fog or wet mist, almost verging on a drizzle" Atkinson Cleve 1868;

Etymology 2

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Noun

Singular
harr

Plural
{{{1}}}

harr ({{{1}}})
  1. (carpentry) The stile that bears the hinges of a gate.
    • 1987, Paul Nooncree Hasluck, “Gates and Rough Fencing”, in The Handyman's Book: Tools, Materials and Processes Employed in Woodworking[3], ISBN 1580082262, page 375,  
      One of the first places for a gate to go rotten is at the junction of the brace and harr.

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