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lambent

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English

Etymology

From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] lambens, present participle of lambō (lick).

Pronunciation

Adjective

lambent (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
lambent

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Brushing or flickering gently over a surface.
    • 1977, Stephen R. Donaldson, Lord Foul’s Bane, page 77
      “As they walked together between the houses, Lena’s smooth arm brushed his. His skin felt lambent at the touch.”
  2. Glowing or luminous, but lacking heat.
    The lambent glow of fireflies delighted the children.
    • 1839, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Jonathan Birch (translator), Faust: A Tragedy, Black and Armstrong, page 127,
      The Witch, with much ceremony, fills the basin. As FAUST is about to raise it to his lips, it emits a clear flame.
      MEPHISTOPHELES. Quick! quickly down with it!—no breathing time allowed! […] And does a lambent flame prevent thee quaff?
  3. Exhibiting lightness or brilliance of wit; clever or witty without unkindness.
    We appreciated her lambent comments.
    • 1800, William Cowper, The Task, Book VI: "The Winter Walk at Noon", Poems, J. Johnson, page 232,
      No foe to man / Lurks in the ſerpent now: the mother ſees, / And ſmiles to ſee, her infant's playful hand / Stretch'd forth to daily with the creſted worm, / To ſtroke his azure neck, or to receive / The lambent homage of his arrowy tongue.

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