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lean

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Old English hleonian (to bend, to recline, to lie down, to rest).

Verb

Infinitive
to lean

Third person singular
leans

Simple past
leant or leaned

Past participle
-

Present participle
leaning

to lean (third-person singular simple present leans, present participle leaning, simple past and past participle leant or leaned)
  1. To hang outwards.
  2. To press against.
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2

Old English hlæne.

Adjective

lean (comparative lean, superlative er)

Positive
lean

Comparative
lean

Superlative
er

  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) slim; not fleshy.
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) having little fat.
  3. Having little extra or little to spare.
    a lean budget
  4. Of a fuel-air mixture, having more air than is necessary to burn all of the fuel; more air- or oxygen- rich than necessary for a stoichiometric reaction.
Synonyms
  • WikiSaurus.png Wikisaurus has an article on “thin” in the sense of “skinny”.
Translations

References

  • "lean" at The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

lean” in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish lenaid (stays, sticks (to), follows) < Proto-Celtic *linā- (stick) < Proto-Indo-European *(s)lei- (slimy); cf. Latin linō (anoint), Sanskrit लिनाति (lināti), sticks, stays).

Pronunciation

  • (Munster) IPA: [lʲan̪ˠ]
  • (Connacht, Ulster) IPA: [l̠ʲanˠ], [l̠ʲan̪ˠ]

Verb

lean

  1. to follow

Conjugation


Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈlæːɑn/

Etymology 1

From Germanic *launan, from a suffixed form of Indo-European *law- ‘catch’. Cognate with Old Frisian lān, Old Saxon lōn (Dutch loon), Old High German lōn (German Lohn), Old Norse laun (Swedish lön), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌿𐌽. The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek λεία (from *λαϝία), Latin lucrum, Old Church Slavonic ловъ (Russian лов), Old Irish lóg, Lithuanian lãvinti.

Noun

lēan n. (plural same)

  1. reward
Related terms

Etymology 2

From Germanic. Cognate with Old Saxon lahan, Old High German lahan, Old Norse , Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌹𐌰𐌽.

Verb

lēan (class VI strong: third-person singular preterite lōg, third-person plural preterite lōgon)

  1. (transitive) to blame, find fault with, reproach

Spanish

Verb

lean (infinitive: leer)

  1. Second-person plural (“ustedes”) imperative form of leer.
  2. Second-person plural (ustedes) present subjunctive form of leer.
  3. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present subjunctive form of leer.

West Frisian

Noun

lean c.

  1. wage, wages, salary

Example

  • "Frank Lloyd Wright hat de baan krigen en syn earste lean wie 25 dollar yn 'e wike." (For his first salary, Frank Lloyd Wright received 25 dollars per week.)

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