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like

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
To love one child and to love all children, whether living or dead—somewhere these two loves come together. To love a no-good but humble punk and to love an honest man who believes himself to be an honest man—somewhere these, too, come together.
Marguerite Duras
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Wikipedia
See also lǐkē, and lìkè

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old English līcian.

Verb

Infinitive
to like

Third person singular
lik

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to like (third-person singular simple present lik, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To enjoy; prefer; favor; be in favor of.
    I like hamburgers.
    I like skiing in winter.
    I like the Milwaukee Braves this season.
  2. To prefer and maintain (an action) as a regular habit or activity.
    I like to go to the dentist every six months.
    She likes to keep herself physically fit.
    We like to keep one around the office just in case.
  3. To find attractive; to prefer the company of; to have mild romantic feelings for.
    I really like Sandra but don't know how to tell her.
  4. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To want.
Usage notes
  • In its senses of “enjoy” and “maintain as a regular habit”, like is a catenative verb; in the former, it usually takes a gerund (-ing form), while in the latter, it takes a to-infinitive. See also Appendix:English catenative verbs.
  • Like is only used to mean “want” in certain expressions, such as “if you like” and “I would like”. The conditional form, would like, is used quite freely as a polite synonym for want.
Synonyms
  • (find attractive): fancy (British)
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

Singular
like

Plural
{{{1}}}

like ({{{1}}})
  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Something that a person likes (prefers).
    Tell me your likes and dislikes.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English līc.

Adjective

like (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
like

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. similar
    May partner and I have like minds.
Related terms
Translations

Noun

Singular
like

Plural
{{{1}}}

like ({{{1}}})
  1. (sometimes as the likes of) Someone similar to a given person, or something similar to a given object; a comparative; a type; a sort.
    We shall never see his like again.Winston Churchill on T.E. Lawrence
    There were bowls full of sweets, chocolates and the like.
    It was something the likes of which I had never seen before.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Translations

Conjunction

like

  1. As if; as though.
    It looks like you've finished the project.
    It seemed like you didn't care.
Derived terms

Preposition

like

  1. Somewhat similar to, reminiscent of.
    These hamburgers taste like leather.
Antonyms
Translations

Particle

like

Wikipedia
  1. (colloquial) A mild intensifier; sometimes indicating approximation or unsurety.
    There were, like, twenty of them.
    And then he, like, got all angry and left the room.
  2. (colloquial, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) When preceded by any form of the verb to be, used to mean “to say”; used to precede an approximate quotation or paraphrase.
    I was like, “Why did you do that?” and he's like, “I don't know.”
Synonyms
  • (colloquial: used to precede paraphrased quotations): be all, go
Usage notes

The use as a quotative is deliberately informal and commonly used by young people, and often combined with the use of the present tense as a narrative. Similar terms are to go and all, as in I go, “Why did you do that?” and he goes, “I don't know” and I was all, “Why did you do that?” and he was all, “I don't know.” These expressions can imply that the attributed remark which follows is representative rather than necessarily an exact quotation; however, in speech these structures do tend to require mimicking the original speakers inflection in a way said would not.

Translations

Interjection

like

  1. (Geordie) Used to place emphasis upon a statement.
    divint ye knaa, like?
References
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

Mandarin

simpl. and trad.
立刻

Pronunciation

  • IPA: [ li˥˩kʰə˥˩ ]

Adverb

like (Pinyin lìkè, traditional and simplified 立刻)

  1. immediately, at once

See also


Norwegian

Verb

like (present tense liker; past tense likte; past participle likt; present participle likende; imperative lik)

  1. to like

Scots

Interjection

like!

  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Used to place emphasis upon a statement.
    Oo jist saw it the now, like.

Swedish

Noun

Inflection for like Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative like liken likar likarna
Genitive likes likens likars likarnas

like c.

  1. match (someone similarly skilful)
    Han hade mött sin like — He had met his match

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