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limpid

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Wicked men obey from fear; good men, from love.
Aristotle
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English

Etymology

From Latin limpidus.

Pronunciation

Adjective

limpid

  1. Clear, particularly transparent or bright.

Quotations

1841 1870 1876 1902 1904
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  • 1841James Fenimore Cooper, The Deerslayer, Ch. 2
    On a level with the point lay a broad sheet of water, so placid and limpid that it resembled a bed of the pure mountain atmosphere.
  • 1870Charles Dickens, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Ch. IV
    Her limpid blue eyes were fixed upon me, her semi-transparent hands were clasped together, pallor overspread her aquiline features, and, though encouraged to proceed, she never did proceed a word further.
  • 1876Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. XIV
    Tom stirred up the other pirates and they all clattered away with a shout, and in a minute or two were stripped and chasing after and tumbling over each other in the shallow limpid water of the white sandbar.
  • 1902Rudyard Kipling, Just So Stories : The Elephant's Child
    Then the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake scuffled down from the bank and said, 'My young friend, if you do not now, immediately and instantly, pull as hard as ever you can, it is my opinion that your acquaintance in the large-pattern leather ulster' (and by this he meant the Crocodile) 'will jerk you into yonder limpid stream before you can say Jack Robinson.'
  • 1904L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz, Ch. 13
    "I must have lived fully three years in that secluded school-house hearth," said he, "drinking thirstily of the ever-flowing fount of limpid knowledge before me."

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