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ossify

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
In between goals is a thing called life, that has to be lived and enjoyed.
Sid Caesar
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English

Etymology

From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] os, ossis (bone) + -ify

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to ossify

Third person singular
ossif

Simple past
ed

Past participle
-

Present participle
i

to ossify (third-person singular simple present ossif, present participle i, simple past and past participle ed)
  1. (ambitransitive) To transform (or cause to transform) from a softer animal substance into bone; particularly the processes of growth in humans and animals.
    • 1884, Arthur C. Cole, Studies in Microscopical Science, p. 35,
      [] , nor do all bones of the same skeleton ossify during the samе period of time.
  2. (ambitransitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To become (or cause to become) inflexible and rigid in habits or opinions.
    • 1996, Peter Schwartz, The Art of the Long View , p. 96,
      Before long, the entire organization ossifies.
    • 2006, Michael S. Jones, Metaphysics of Religion: Lucian Blaga and Contemporary Philosophy , p. 79,
      Possession of absolute knowledge would ossify the human spirit, quenching human creativity;
  3. (ambitransitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To grow (or cause to grow) formulaic and permanent.
    • 1886, Karl Marx, translated by Samuel Moore, Capital, Volume I, Chapter 14,
      This accidental repartition gets repeated, develops advantages of its own, and gradually ossifies into a systematic division of labour.
    • 2001, Alain Finkielkraut, translated by Kevin O'Neill and David Suchoff, The Wisdom of Love , p. 55,
      Now, in turn, we apply a revolutionary critique that [] ossifies into a rhetoric to become "the monstrous Latin of a monstrous church."
    • 2005, Michelle Goldberg, "The war on 'Munich'", Salon.com, December 20, 2005,
      [T]he charge threatens to ossify into conventional wisdom before the movie's audience can get to theaters to see how misguided it is.
  4. (rare) To calcify.
    • 1850, Roxey Ann Caplin, Health and Beauty, Chapter X,
      The cartilages become brittle, and in many instances are ossified; the ligaments are rendered harder, but are less capable of resisting extension.

Synonyms

  • (become inflexible and rigid): harden

Related terms

Translations

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