Visit the forum if you have a language query!

otiose

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Nowadays men cannot love seven night but they must have all their desires: that love may not endure by reason; for where they be soon accorded and hasty, heat soon it cooleth. Right so fareth love nowadays, soon hot soon cold: this is no stability. But the old love was not so.
Sir Thomas Malory
Jump to: navigation, search

English

Etymology

From [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] ōtiōsus ‘idle’ < ōtium ‘ease’.

Pronunciation

Adjective

otiose (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
otiose

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Resulting in no effect.
  2. Reluctant to work or to exert oneself.
  3. Having no reason for being (raison d’être); having no point, reason, or purpose.
    • 1895, Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Letters, ch 3
      On Friday morning, I had to be at my house affairs before seven; and they kept me in Apia till past ten, disputing, and consulting about brick and stone and native and hydraulic lime, and cement and sand, and all sorts of otiose details about the chimney – just what I fled from in my father’s office twenty years ago;

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Elsewhere on the web

En-En

En-It

En-Fr

En-El

En-Sp

En-Mul

En-De

OnelookIATEIATEIATEIATEProZDict.cc
WordnikIATELinguee
GoogleIATE