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predicate

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English

Etymology 1

From Middle French predicat (French prédicat), from post-classical [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] praedicatum ‘thing said of a subject’, a noun use of the neuter past participle of praedicare ‘proclaim’, as Etymology 2, below.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈprɛdɪkət/

Noun

Singular
predicate

Plural
{{{1}}}

predicate ({{{1}}})
  1. (grammar) The part of the sentence (or clause) which states something about the subject.
    In "The dog barked very loudly", the subject is "the dog" and the predicate is "barked very loudly".
  2. (logic) A statement that may be true or false depending on the values of its variables.
  3. (computing) An operator or function that returns either true or false.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From the participle stem of [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] praedicare, from prae- ‘pre-’ + dicare ‘proclaim’.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈprɛdɪˌkeɪt/

Verb

Infinitive
to predicate

Third person singular
predicat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to predicate (third-person singular simple present predicat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To announce or assert publically.
  2. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To state, assert.
  3. (transitive) To suppose, assume; to infer.
    • 1859: There was a character about Madame Defarge, from which one might have predicated that she did not often make mistakes against herself in any of the reckonings over which she presided. — Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
    • 1881: Of anyone else it would have been said that she must be finding the afternoon rather dreary in the quaint halls not of her forefathers: but of Miss Power it was unsafe to predicate so surely. — Thomas Hardy, A Laodicean
  4. (transitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To base (on); to assert on the grounds of.
    • 1978: the law is what constitutes both desire and the lack on which it is predicated. — Michel Foucault, The Will to Knowledge, trans. Robert Hurley (Penguin 1998, p. 81)
Translations

Italian

Verb

predicate

  1. second person plural present tense and imperative of predicare

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