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prognosticate

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

Etymology

From Old Italian prognosticare, from Latin prognosticum (-con), from Ancient Greek προγνωστικόν (prognostikon), neutral of προγνωστικός (prognostikos) "foreknowing, prescient, prognostic", from prefix πρό- (pro-) + γνωστικός (gnostikos) "of or for knowing, good at knowing", from γιγνώσκω (gignosko) "to learn to know, to perceive, to mark, to learn".

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to prognosticate

Third person singular
prognosticat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to prognosticate (third-person singular simple present prognosticat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To predict or forecast, especially through the application of skill.
    Examining the tea-leaves, she prognosticated dark days ahead.
  2. (transitive) To presage, betoken.
    The bluebells may prognosticate an early spring this year.

Quotations

1598 1847
ME: [[{{{enm}}}]] « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1598William Shakespeare, Sonnet xiv
    But from thine eyes my knowledge I derive,
    And constant stars in them I read such art
    As 'Truth and beauty shall together thrive,
    If from thyself, to store thou wouldst convert';
    Or else of thee this I prognosticate:
    'Thy end is truth's and beauty's doom and date.'
  • 1847Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights ch. 7
    ...to-morrow I intend lengthening the night till afternoon. I prognosticate for myself an obstinate cold, at least.

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