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rear

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English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Ultimately from [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] retro; confer arrear.

Adjective

rear (not comparable)

Positive
rear

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. Being behind, or in the hindmost part; hindmost; as, the rear rank of a company.
Antonyms
Translations

Adverb

rear (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
rear

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. early; soon Prov. Eng.
    • Then why does Cuddy leave his cot so rear! --Gay.

Noun

Singular
rear

Plural
{{{1}}}

rear ({{{1}}})
  1. The back or hindmost part; that which is behind, or last on order; - opposed to front.
    • Nipped with the lagging rear of winter's frost. - w:Milton
  2. (military) Specifically, the part of an army or fleet which comes last, or is stationed behind the rest.
    • When the fierce foe hung on our broken rear. --Milton
Translations
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Etymology 2

Old English ræran

Verb

Infinitive
to rear

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to rear (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To raise; to lift up; to cause to rise, to elevate; as, to rear a monolith.
    • In adoration at his feet I fell Submiss; he reared me. —Milton
    • It reareth our hearts from vain thoughts. —Barrow
    • Mine [shall be] the first hand to rear her banner. —Ld. Lytton
  2. (transitive) To construct by building; to set up; as, to rear defenses or houses; to rear one government on the ruins of another.
    • One reared a font of stone. —Tennyson
  3. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To lift and take up.
    • And having her from Trompart lightly reared, Upon his set the lovely load. —Spenser
  4. (transitive) To bring up to maturity, as young; to educate; to instruct; to foster; as, to rear offspring.
    • He wants a father to protect his youth, and rear him up to virtue. —Southern
  5. (transitive) To breed and raise; as, to rear cattle (cattle-rearing).
  6. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To rouse; to strip up.
    • And seeks the tusky boar to rear. —Dryden
  7. (intransitive) To rise up on the hind legs, as a horse.
Translations

Anagrams

See also

Synonyms

Usage notes

See note under raise.

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