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shall

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Love is as much of an object as an obsession, everybody wants it, everybody seeks it, but few ever achieve it, those who do will cherish it, be lost in it, and among all, never... never forget it.
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English

Etymology

Old English sceal, of Germanic origin. Compare Dutch zal.

Pronunciation

Verb

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Infinitive
-

Third person singular
shall

Simple past
should

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

- (third-person singular simple present shall, present participle -, simple past should, past participle -)
  1. (Modal auxiliary verb. Defective.)Used before a verb to indicate the simple future tense, particularly in the first person singular or plural.
    I shall sing in the choir tomorrow
  2. Used similarly to indicate determination or obligation, particularly in the second and third persons singular and plural.
    (determination): You shall go to the ball!
    (obligation): Citizens shall provide proof of identity.
  3. Used in questions to suggest a possible future action.
    Shall we go out later?
  4. (archaic) Used to indicate destiny or certainty.
    Goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life.
  5. (obsolete) To owe.

Usage notes

  • Historically, shall is the present tense and should is its past tense.
You have done that you should be sorry for.
You have done that you shall be sorry for.
  • In the past, will and shall have been used similarly as auxiliary verbs for the future tense. The simple future tense traditionally uses shall for the first person ("I" and "we"), and will for the second and third persons.
I shall go.
You will go.
  • An emphatic future tense, with a sense of must, reverses the two words, using will for the first person and shall for the second and third person.
I will go.
You shall go.
  • Usage can be reversed in questions and in dependent clauses—especially with indirect discourse. For example: Shall you do it? is equivalent in meaning to Will you do it? as it anticipates your response I shall do it. Or: he says that he shall win or he expects that he shall win report his saying I shall win, not I will win.

Translations

See also

Elsewhere on the web

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