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sib

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
To fall in love is easy, even to remain in it is not difficult; our human loneliness is cause enough. But is a hard quest worth making to find a comrade through whose steady presence one becomes steadily the person one desires to be.
Anna Strong
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English

Etymology

From Middle English, itself from Old English sibb 'kinship'; akin to Old High German sippa and [[w:Template:lang:la language|Template:lang:la]][[Category:Template:lang:la derivations]] suus

Pronunciation

Adjective

sib (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
sib

Comparative
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Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. related, by birth or descent; similar to
    • 1980, Anthony Burgess, Earthly Powers:
      But she got up to go, and Domenico obeyed me too in mock meekness, making himself sib and coeval to Hortense, submissive to frowning elder brother, something incestuous in it.

Noun

Singular
sib

Plural
{{{1}}}

sib ({{{1}}})
  1. kindred, relatives; kinsman, blood relation.
  2. sibling, brother or sister (irrespective of gender); in biology extended to any group of animals or plants sharing a corresponding genetic relation
  3. a group of individuals unilaterally descended from a single (real or postulated) common ancestor

Derived terms

References

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Old High German

Etymology

West Germanic *sibhi, whence also Old English sife

Noun

sib n

  1. sieve

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