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skedaddle

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

Etymology

Probably an alteration of British dialect scaddle (to run off in a fright), from the adjective scaddle (wild, timid, skittish), from Middle English scathel, skadylle (harmful, fierce, wild), of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skathi (harm). Possibly related to the Greek skedastios (dispersion). (US) Possibly related to scud or scat.

EB1911A-pict1.png This entry lacks an etymology. If you are familiar with the origin of this word, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “Greek script needed”

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to skedaddle

Third person singular
skedaddl

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to skedaddle (third-person singular simple present skedaddl, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To move or run away quickly.
    The sheep skedaddled as soon as the shepherd’s dog came near.

Synonyms

Translations

References

  1. 1897 Hunter, Robert, and Charles Morris (editors), Universal Dictionary of the English Language, v4, p4291: "Etym. doubtful; perhaps allied to scud.] To betake one's self hurriedly to flight; to run away as in a panic; to fly in terror. (A word of American origin.)"

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