Visit the forum if you have a language query!

stir

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
There's night and day, brother, both sweet things; sun, moon, and stars, brother, all sweet things; there's likewise a wind on the heath. Life is very sweet, brother; who would wish to die?
George Borrow
Jump to: navigation, search

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old English styrian

Verb

Infinitive
to stir

Third person singular
stir

Simple past
ing

Past participle
-

Present participle
r

to stir (third-person singular simple present stir, present participle r, simple past and past participle ing)
  1. (transitive) To change the place of in any manner; to move.
    My foot I had never yet in five days been able to stir. —Sir W. Temple
  2. (transitive) To disturb the relative position of the particles of, as of a liquid, by passing something through it; to agitate
    She stired a pudding with a spoon.
    My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirred. —Shak
  3. (transitive) To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
    Stir not questions of jurisdiction. —Bacon
  4. (transitive) To incite to action; to arouse; to instigate; to prompt; to excite.
    To stir men to devotion. —Chaucer
    An Ate, stirring him to blood and strife. —Shak.
    And for her sake some mutiny will stir. —Dryden.
  5. (intransitive) To move; to change one’s position.
    I had not power to stir or strive, But felt that I was still alive. —Byron.
  6. (intransitive) To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy one's self.
    All are not fit with them to stir and toil. —Byron.
    The friends of the unfortunate exile, far from resenting his unjust suspicions, were stirring anxiously in his behalf. —Merivale.
  7. (intransitive) To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
    They fancy they have a right to talk freely upon everything that stirs or appears. —I. Watts.
  8. (intransitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To rise, or be up, in the morning. —Shak.
Usage notes
  • In all transitive senses except the first, stir is often followed by up with an intensive effect; as, to stir up fire; to stir up sedition.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

Singular
stir

Plural
s

stir (s)
  1. The act or result of stirring; agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
    Why all these words, this clamor, and this stir? —Denham.
    Consider, after so much stir about genus and species, how few words we have yet settled definitions of. —Locke.
  2. Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
    Being advertised of some stirs raised by his unnatural sons in England. —Sir J.Davies.
  3. Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.
Translations

Etymology 2

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Noun

Singular
stir

Plural
-

stir (-)
  1. (slang) Jail; prison.
    He's going to spendin' maybe ten years in stir.

Elsewhere on the web

En-En

En-It

En-Fr

En-El

En-Sp

En-Mul

En-De

OnelookIATEIATEIATEIATEProZDict.cc
WordnikIATELinguee
GoogleIATE