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stray

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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A stray dog wanders the streets.

English

Etymology

Middle English in origin, from the Anglo-Norman and Old French verb estrayer, and the Anglo-Norman noun and adjective (a)strey, both from the Old French estraié, from Low Latin via strata, paved road[1].

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
stray

Plural
{{{1}}}

stray ({{{1}}})
  1. Any domestic animal that has an inclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray. Used also figuratively.
  2. The act of wandering or going astray.
  3. [historical] An area of common land or place administered for the use of general domestic animals, i.e. "The Stray"

Related terms

Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to stray

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to stray (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way.
  2. To wander from company, or from the proper limits; to rove at large; to roam; to go astray.
  3. Figuratively, to wander from the path of duty or rectitude; to err.

Translations

Synonyms

Adjective

stray (not comparable)

Positive
stray

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. To cause to stray.
  2. Having gone astray; strayed; wandering; as, a stray horse or sheep.

Translations

References

  • Notes:
  1. ^ Stray in Online Etymology Dictionary

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