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suit

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
An idea, to be suggestive, must come to the individual with the force of revelation.
William James
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English

Etymology

Anglo-Norman siute, from Old French sieute (modern suite), originally a participle adjective from vulgar Latin *sequita, from Latin sequi ‘follow’.

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
suit

Plural
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suit ({{{1}}})
  1. (law) The attempt to gain an end by legal process; a process instituted in a court of law for the recovery of a right or claim; a lawsuit.
    If you take my advice, you'll file suit against him immediately.
  2. (obsolete): The act of following or pursuing; pursuit, chase.
  3. (obsolete) The act of suing; the pursuit of a particular object or goal.
    Thenceforth the suit of earthly conquest shone. —Spenser.
  4. Pursuit of a love-interest; wooing, courtship.
    Rebate your loves, each rival suit suspend, Till this funereal web my labors end. —Pope.
  5. (archaic) A company of attendants or followers; a retinue.
  6. (archaic) A group of similar or related objects or items considered as a whole; a suite (of rooms etc.)
  7. The full set of sails required for a ship.
  8. A set of clothes to be worn together, now especially a man's matching jacket and trousers, or a similar outfit for a woman.
    Nick hired a navy-blue suit for the wedding.
  9. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A person who wears matching jacket and trousers, especially a boss or a supervisor.
    Be sure to keep your nose to the grindstone today; the suits are making a "surprise" visit to this department.
  10. A full set of armour.
  11. (card games) Each of the sets of a pack of cards distinguished by color and/or specific emblems, such as the spades, hearts, diamonds, or clubs of traditional Anglo, Hispanic, and French playing cards.
    To deal and shuffle, to divide and sort Her mingled suits and sequences. —Cowper.
  12. (obsolete) Regular order; succession.
    Every five and thirty years the same kind and suit of weather comes again. —Bacon.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to suit

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to suit (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To fit; to adapt; to make proper or suitable; as, to suit the action to the word. —Shak.
  2. To be fitted to; to accord with; to become; to befit.
    Ill suits his cloth the praise of railing well. —Dryden.
    Raise her notes to that sublime degree Which suits song of piety and thee. —Prior.
  3. To dress; to clothe.
    So went he suited to his watery tomb. —Shak.
  4. To please; to make content; as, he is well suited with his place; to suit one’s taste.
  5. (intransitive): To agree; to accord; to be fitted; to correspond; — usually followed by with or to.
    The place itself was suiting to his care. —Dryden.
    Give me not an office That suits with me so ill. —Addison.

Synonyms

Translations


French

Verb

suit

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of suivre

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