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through

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Yet each man kills the thing he loves from all let this be heard some does it with a bitter look some with a flattering word the coward does it with a kiss the brave man with the sword.
Oscar Wilde
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English

Etymology 1

Metathesis of Middle English thurh, thourgh < Old English þurh < West Germanic *thurkh < Proto-Indo-European base *tr- ('through'). Cognate with thorough, German durch, Dutch door, Latin trans, Welsh tra ('through').

Pronunciation

Preposition

through

  1. From one side of an opening to the other.
    I went through the window.
  2. Entering, then later exiting.
    I drove through the town at top speed without looking left or right.
  3. Surrounded by (while moving).
    We slogged through the mud for hours before turning back and giving up.
  4. By means of.
    This team believes in winning through intimidation.
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Derived terms

Adjective

through (not comparable)

Positive
through

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. Passing from one side of an object to the other.
    Interstate highways form a nationwide system of through roads.
  2. Finished; complete
    They were through with laying the subroof by noon.
  3. Valueless; without a future.
    After being implicated in the scandal, he was through as an executive in financial services.
  4. No longer interested.
    She was through with him.
  5. Proceeding from origin to destination without delay due to change of equipment.
    The through flight through Memphis was the fastest.

Adverb

through (comparative further through, superlative furthest through)

Positive
through

Comparative
further through

Superlative
furthest through

  1. From one side to the other by way of the interior.
    The arrow went straight through.
  2. From one end to the other.
    Others slept; he worked straight through.
  3. To the end.
    He said he would see it through.
  4. Completely.
    Leave the yarn in the dye overnight so the color soaks through.
  5. Out into the open.
    The American army broke through the German lines at St. Lo.

Etymology 2

From Old English þrūh

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /θrʌf/

Noun

Singular
through

Plural
{{{1}}}

through ({{{1}}})
  1. A large slab of stone laid on a tomb.

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